Additional reading and resources on Sins and Virtues.

Lust... and other books in the Deadly Sins series

Lust, says Simon Blackburn, is furtive, headlong, always sizing up opportunities. It is a trail of clothing in the hallway, the trashy cousin of love. Written by one of the most eminent living philosophers, attractively illustrated and colorfully packaged, Lust is a book that anyone would lust over. 

This series is a collaboration between the New York Public Library and the Oxford University press. It includes Pride by Michael Eric Dyson, Envy by Joseph Epstein, Gluttony by Francine Prose, Anger by Robert A. F. Thurman, Greed by Phyllis A. Tickle, and Sloth by Wendy Wasserstein. 

The Seven Deadly Sins: Jewish, Christian, and Classical Reflections on Human Psychology

In The Seven Deadly Sins, Solomon Schimmel explains why psychology must incorporate many of the ethical and spiritual values of religion and moral philosophy if it is to effectively address the emotional problems faced by modern men and women, be they believers or agnostics. Drawing on the psychological insights of the Bible, Aristotle, Maimonides, Aquinas, and Shakespeare, among others, he shows how all of us can learn from them about the relationship between virtue and psychological well-being and vice and emotional distress. This insightful and fascinating work guides us to master our passions rather than be enslaved by them so that we can become more humane and build a happier, caring society.

The Seven Deadly Sins: A Visitor's Guide

Lawrence Cunningham guides readers on a tour of and personal inquiry into the seven deadly sins--their roots in the mystic experiences of the desert fathers, their modern manifestations, and how to supplant these invasive, destructive habits with virtue.

Sloth, envy, gluttony, greed, anger, lust, and pride: when and how were they first identified? Who grouped them together? Can we truly resist their pull? Renowned theologian Lawrence Cunningham explores these questions and others in his newest book. He traces the roots of the seven deadly sins to the mystic experiences of the desert fathers, who--in total solitude--experienced and identified these corrupt inner desires as forces that twist us away from God. He offers examples and insights from scripture, Christian tradition, and modern life, helping readers meet each of the seven deadly sins with a corresponding virtue.

[Kindle edition]   [Print edition]

Summa Theologica

The Summa Theologica (Latin: "Summary of Theology" or "Highest Theology") is the most famous work of Thomas Aquinas (1225–1274). It was intended as a manual for beginners as a compilation of all of the main theological teachings of the time. The Summa's topics follow a cycle: the existence of God; God's creation, Man; Man's purpose; Christ; the Sacraments; and back to God. It is famous for its five arguments for the existence of God, the Quinquae viae (Latin: five ways). Throughout his work, Aquinas cites Augustine of Hippo, Aristotle, and other Christian, Jewish, Muslim and ancient pagan scholars.

[Kindle edition]    [Print edition]

Glittering Vices: A New Look at the Seven Deadly Sins and Their Remedies

Glittering Vices explores "the traditional meanings of gluttony, sloth, lust, and others. It offers a brief history of how the vices were compiled and an eye opening explication of how each sin manifests itself in various destructive behaviors. Readers gain practical understanding of how the vices shape our culture today and how to correctly identify and eliminate the deeply rooted patterns of sin that are work in their own lives."